Benefits for the crop

As a broad-spectrum herbicide highly effective against a variety of weeds, Glufosinate-ammonium has enabled the healthy production of more than 100 crops, including fruits and nuts, canola, soybean and cotton. This has fostered the availability of more high quality and affordable food as well as various products. Farmers also rely on GA when treating young trees as it is a contact herbicide and so can control weeds surrounding trees without harming the tree itself.

Additionally, crops such as canola, corn, cotton and soybeans with the LibertyLink trait are tolerant to Glufosinate-ammonium. Growers are therefore able to apply this herbicide in-crop for non-selective post-emergence weed control, right up to ten weeks prior to harvest, before these weeds jeopardize yield potential.

Apples are among the most popular fruits worldwide. The antioxidants in apple have several health promoting and disease prevention properties, and thereby, truly justifying the proverb “an apple a day keeps the doctor away”. The total world apple production amounts to almost 80 million tonnes a year. The main apple producer is China, which accounts for more than half of the global production, followed by the United States, India, Turkey, Poland and other countries.

As weeds create colder conditions and compete with apples for essential nutrients, apple farmers spend a considerable amount of management effort and financial resources each year to manage weeds, and to maintain high quality and affordable produce. In particular, they need to keep a band below the trees free of vegetation to avoid nutrition and water competition, and give the trees best growing conditions. On top of that, farmers also have to control excessive sucker growth.

Glufosinate-ammonium is one of the very few products on the market labelled for the control of suckers in apple orchards and a broad spectrum of weeds in one treatment without harming the mother tree. The use of Glufosinate-ammonium as an alternative to the commonly-used Glyphosate helps to avoid problems of weed resistance in apple. If applied correctly under the right weather conditions, it is among the safest crop protection solutions in apple orchards.

Apple orchard after weed control
Apple orchard after weed control

Did you know?

At present, there are at least 7,500 cultivated varieties of apples. If a person eats one different variety every single day, it will take over 20 years to try them all.1
  • The world biggest producer of apples is China, followed by the USA, Turkey and Poland. In 2012 China supplied 50% of the total world production.2
1 | Elzebroek, A.T.G. (2008). Guide to Cultivated Plants. CABI. p.27.
2 | FAOSTAT. (Figures from 2012). http://faostat.fao.org/site/339/default.aspx
Adrian Percy: ”We invest in finding the next generation of weed management systems”

The issue of weed resistance is “serious, but solvable,” said Adrian Percy, head of Research & Development at the Crop Science division of Bayer at the Global Herbicide Resistance Challenge in Denver, Colorado. The conference took place from May 14-18, 2017 and gathered over 300 experts to discuss the global issue of herbicide resistance. To overcome the issue, Bayer is committed to innovation and education and continues working in partnerships worldwide. Besides looking for new herbicides, Bayer has been promoting its Integrated Weed Management initiative, a holistic approach to tackling weeds with a combination of physical, cultural, biological and chemical measures that are cost effective and sustainable.

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Is Glufosinate-ammonium present in our food?

Any traces of Glufosinate-ammonium that may remain on crops and that are ingested directly by humans or indirectly as a result of consuming meat and milk from animals that have fed on such crops are limited at stricter levels than defined toxicological safety thresholds.

Learn about LibertyLink Crops

Why GA helps farmers: apples

Is Glufosinate-ammonium present in our food?

Any traces of Glufosinate-ammonium that may remain on crops and that are ingested directly by humans or indirectly as a result of consuming meat and milk from animals that have fed on such crops are limited at stricter levels than defined toxicological safety thresholds.

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